The Flatiron Farewell Blog

Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash

This is it. The last blog post for Flatiron School. To be honest, when I started the program and saw that I was required to write blogs I wasn’t exactly thrilled. I had never written a blog before and didn’t see the point of requiring it for a coding bootcamp. Now that I am writing the final post I not only see why it was required, but will continue to write after I graduate.

The first post was definitely the toughest. I had to write about why I was pursuing a career change in software engineering. I’ve always been a fairly private person, not one to openly present anything about myself to a wide audience. Writing about myself and then putting it out here on Medium was difficult but once it was out I started to receive support from people and it was very reassuring.

The several posts that followed were all about the projects I had created for Flatiron School. It was during these that I started to realize the value of blogging. I would usually focus on things I learned while creating the project, problems I encountered, and issues that were resolved. Having to put those things into words really got me to reflect on how these concepts worked and really improved my technical vocabulary and overall understanding.

I have been learning to code for a few years now and part of what I love about the journey is the endless expanse of knowledge that can be gained on a daily basis. There is always something new to learn or some concept to improve on that I enjoy. While researching for a project or even just in my spare time I would read other blogs by people and found a lot of useful information that helped me in some way. As I was writing my own posts I felt I was better understanding the concepts I had learned. While I am sure I have gotten things wrong or could have better explained some concepts, I hope in some way someone out there has found anything I’ve posted worthwhile.

Recently I’ve been reflecting on some of the concepts I’ve enjoyed learning about through the Flatiron program. Things like MVC and CRUD in Rails, higher order functions in JavaScript, and creating and modifying component state in React. These are things I found valuable to learn for software development but something I learned in addition to this, and was not expecting to when I started at Flatiron, was the importance of writing down one’s own thoughts. The ability to convey the concepts of coding really encourage the person writing about it to put what they know into perspective and the act of communicating those concepts helps a great deal with fully understanding them.

I have learned a lot in my time at Flatiron. I’ve gained valuable coding experience and created apps that I am proud of. These were things I had expected when I started. What I did not expect was how much I would enjoy writing these blogs. Although my time at Flatiron is almost over I will continue to post about my experiences and, hopefully, will have a new coding job to talk about soon.

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Industrial electrician working towards a career change in software engineering. Graduate of Flatiron School. Family man. Zappa fanatic.

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John Troutman

John Troutman

Industrial electrician working towards a career change in software engineering. Graduate of Flatiron School. Family man. Zappa fanatic.

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